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Hmn.... Hot rod Gauges or spend a grip on Autometers
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73IHC
Monday August 23 2010
73 Just Like Me!!!!
Registered Member #980
Joined: Saturday March 15 2008
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1118
Dues paying member of Scouts West
I was browsing ebay and found these from $255 - $199....
LINK

I need to get my gas gauge working soon so I can use my rig as a daily driver...

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Tim Potter
Tuesday August 24 2010
Registered Member #755
Joined: Monday January 29 2007
Location: the Netherregions
Posts: 2792
Looks like a pretty good deal on the guage sets. I've got over twice that in mine; close to a grand in the whole set up including lights and wiring. I had to fab my cluster panel, you may want to consider this to avoid spending more money on one with the holes already drilled.

On the other hand, it's possible to buy a new dash panel already loaded with the guages needed: LINK Personally, I'd ask for a vacuum guage or possibly a tranny temp guage (depending on how much worry you can stand) in place of the clock, which to my thinking is virtually useless. The price of this unit might seem high but, considering the alternative that I chose it's about half. You will still need to add the lights to this panel anyway.

Which brings me to this; what exactly is wrong with your stock fuel guage? Have you done any troubleshooting on it?

I know a guy that has a pretty clever fuel guage installed since his stock unit doesn't work at all. He uses a combination suitcase type lock on the dash to record the mileage when he fills his tank. Based on his "best guess" of his mileage, he knows when to pull into the pump again. It's a funny way to do it but hey, it works. Ya just have to remember to reset the lock
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73IHC
Wednesday August 25 2010
73 Just Like Me!!!!
Registered Member #980
Joined: Saturday March 15 2008
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1118
Dues paying member of Scouts West
Well right now I have the oem tank, plan on putting in an RV 35gal tank soon...

I tried the odometer think I can get 9MPG and ran out of gas... Ended up late at work and pretty flammable so I dont want to do that again...

My gauges all work except the gas so I am just get the gas gauge fixed when I put in the 35gal but those round gauges shure do look sweet....

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Tim Potter
Wednesday August 25 2010
Registered Member #755
Joined: Monday January 29 2007
Location: the Netherregions
Posts: 2792
73IHC wrote ...

My gauges all work except the gas so I am just get the gas gauge fixed when I put in the 35gal


If only the fuel guage isn't working, trouble shooting should be pretty easy. It's either going to be the sender, the signal wire or the guage and each can be tested independently to narrow down the problem. It will be easiest to do when you change out tanks. You can remove the sender from the tank at that time. Maybe you get a new sender with the bigger capacity tank, I'm not sure about that. It would make sense if you did.

If you do get a new sender then this won't matter to you. The sender has a wiper mechanism which varies the ohm resistance from 73 empty to 10 full. The easiest way to test this is to hook a multi meter pos between sender, center contact (signal) and neg to ground. Move the float up and down and read the resistance range. Age wears on the contacts, you might get in the neighborhood of 5-58 ohm but it should still work. Low resistance numbers explain why most Scout fuel guages read 7/8 or even less when the tank is full.

The 73-10 ohm range is important to you if you intend to use your stock guage because all the senders and guages are matched ohm range. So for example, if you get a 0-100 range sender, it won't work with a stock guage because the range is backward.

Testing the signal wire is a matter of testing for continuity between the wire blade connector at the sender end and the pin socket that plugs into the back of the amp/fuel guage. The signal wire (cir 36) runs from the sender to the small BHC on the right side of the fire wall (M) so you'll want to verify continuity at that location.

You'll want to remove the pos battery terminal before removing the guage cluster then protect the big blue wires on the ammeter against shorting out. Carefully remove the plug and reconnect the pos terminal at the battery, I believe there are 4 contact sockets in the plug. The #9 (bottom left) hole and pin are the signal wire. If you find continuity at the plug end of the signal wire, and not between the signal wire and ground; the wire is ok all the way to the plug.

Leaving only the guage. This is the hard one and I hope not your problem. There's a couple ways to test this, both of which require a trip to Radio Shack. You'll want either a 0-100 ohm range potentiometer and a bunch of test leads or a bunch of dedicated resisters that you can solder together in series and a bunch of test leads. The idea is essentially the same as recreating the wiper mechanism in the sender. So, you'll stack up a combinations of resisters that equal 73 ohms (75 is ok) and one that is 10 ohm. By connecting the 73 stack between the signal pin on the back of the guage and ground you should get an empty reading. Doing the same thing with the 10 ohm resister should yield a full reading on the guage. The potentiometer will do the same thing, You just won't know what resistance the guage is responding to unless you once again hook a digital multi meter in line between the potentiometer and the pin. This sounds a lot harder than it really is.

If the guage is non responsive, there is one more possibility. The fuel guage gets it's power at the # 8 pin from the #8 pin on the Temp/OP guage. If one of the pins is loose you may not be getting power. Test the #8 socket for 5 volts which is provided by the CVR.

The pin arrangement on the back of the fuel guage, and the temp/op guage looks like this:
03 02 01
06 05 04
09 08 07

If everything tests correctly and the guage is still non responsive, the guage will have to be replaced or, there is a shop in Whittier that can rebuild it for you. You may have a similar shop near you too. While you're at this, now is a good time to clean and service all the contacts on all the guages.

hope all this helps; good luck and keep us posted on your progress
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Clint S
Monday August 30 2010
Registered Member #843
Joined: Tuesday October 02 2007
Location: La Habra
Posts: 92
Dues paying member of Scouts West
Tim has already provided you with a ton of info, but I wanted to add that one area you don't want to cheap out is the gauges that you rely on to make sure everything is in check. I prefer to buy known name brands when it comes to gauges. Believe it or not, Autometer is kind of the bottom shelf cheapo stuff compared to other more reliable brands out there (for example check out defi gauges or AEM products). Maybe this comes from my experience in autocross and road racing cars...in this world you CANNOT compromise when you're pushing your vehicle to the absolute limits. The same can be said in 4x4, but I guess it's not as critical for daily driving.

One thing I noticed from the link you provided is that they are "mechanical" gauges. To most people mechanical gauges are inferior to electrical gauges (though some will argue in favor of mechanical ones). An example of the difference would be the oil pressure gauge. In a mechanical one, you have a nylon tube (or copper) that the oil travels in through the firewall to the back of the gauge on the dash. Some people don't like the idea of a potential oil leak inside the vehicle. An electrical oil gauge would involve an oil pressure sending unit mounted to the block that sends an electrical signal through a wire to the gauge inside the car. This is how the Scout is set up from the factory for oil pressure and fuel, but the aftermarket electrical oil pressure sending unit and gauge combo would be much more accurate.

My personal choice for "gauges" is Zeitronix (pardon me for going on a rabbit trail here...this probably isn't what you're looking for but it is my favorite setup). The Zeitronix packages are not your typical gauge setup (ie not your basic gauges that you install in a cluster panel), but with the proper package you can have a wideband air to fuel ratio O2 sensor and gauge (to fine tune your carb), vacuum, EGT, and your choice of several fluid options like oil pressure/temp or water pressure/temp. This info doesn't all go to your traditional analogue gauge panel setup, but it goes to either an LCD display or digital gauges that can show you a variety of information. On top of that you can datalog all this info with a laptop. You also have the option of installing a buzzer/LED that will audibly and visually warn you if any of the parameters you are watching go out of a pre-determined range that you set up (i.e. if your water temp gets too high the buzzer/light can warn you before your engine overheats). This setup is much more popular for tuner cars and muscle cars than it is for Scout owners, but they can be set up on any fuel injected or carbureted vehicle. I have a Zeitronix setup in my daily driver/autocrossing car, and I'm planning on getting a setup for my Scout later on.

'78 Traveler
345 w/ Edelbrock 4bbl carb & Tri-y headers
Built TF727 Trans
4 inch lift Triangle springs, 2 inch lifted shackles
33x12.50 Yokohama Geolanders
Roll bar/cage
www.clintsgarage.blogspot.com
www.clintstringfellow.com
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